Sending and receiving text messages in Rails with Twitter

In this tutorial I cover how to set up a basic Ruby on Rails 2.2.2 application and how to connect it to the Twitter API. Then I demonstrate receiving and sending Tweets, i.e. text messages through Twitter. I’ve also shared the code in Google Code.


WHOOZ Tutorial: Sending and receiving text messages in Rails with Twitter

Download the code for this tutorial here: whooz-twittter-integration.zip (LGPL 3.0)

This code requires Rails 2 – if you have OS X 10.5, it ships with 1.2; you can upgrade with the commands sudo gem update --system and sudo gem install rails

Remote personal assistants

Remote personal assistants:

Rakesh started working for me a few weeks ago. We communicate over instant messenger and so far it is going well. He is dedicated to me for four hours a day, twenty hours a week. I pay his company–Tasks Everyday– $7 bucks an hour for his services. He works from 1 in the morning to 4 in the morning Mumbai time. Last week I asked him to write a blog post for me about himself. I wanted to know about his life and what it was like to live in Mumbai. I am fascinated with India. I have not edited his post at all to give you an idea of his English level. I love the quote at the very end of his post. Check it out and let me know what you think about this.

My personal assistant in Mumbai, India: Rakesh Chaudhari (Dave Ford)

Tasks Everyday

Catch Friday – Your Virtual Personal Assistant

Remote personal assistants:

Rakesh started working for me a few weeks ago. We communicate over instant messenger and so far it is going well. He is dedicated to me for four hours a day, twenty hours a week. I pay his company–Tasks Everyday– $7 bucks an hour for his services. He works from 1 in the morning to 4 in the morning Mumbai time. Last week I asked him to write a blog post for me about himself. I wanted to know about his life and what it was like to live in Mumbai. I am fascinated with India. I have not edited his post at all to give you an idea of his English level. I love the quote at the very end of his post. Check it out and let me know what you think about this.

My personal assistant in Mumbai, India: Rakesh Chaudhari (Dave Ford)

Tasks Everyday

Catch Friday – Your Virtual Personal Assistant

This mirror reflects a wide-angled view without distortion

This mirror reflects a wide-angled view without distortion – straight lines in the real world translate to straight lines on the convex surface. It was made for a stair-climbing robot at the University of Pennsylvania. A camera pointed at the mirror can see a very wide-angled view in which the stairs appear straight, making navigation easier. (Image: Andrew Hicks) (via Gallery – The next generation of mirrors – Image 4 – New Scientist)

This mirror reflects a wide-angled view without distortion – straight lines in the real world translate to straight lines on the convex surface. It was made for a stair-climbing robot at the University of Pennsylvania. A camera pointed at the mirror can see a very wide-angled view in which the stairs appear straight, making navigation easier. (Image: Andrew Hicks) (via Gallery – The next generation of mirrors – Image 4 – New Scientist)

This mirror does not produce a “mirror” image

This mirror does not produce a “mirror” image, making it possible to read reflected text normally. Hicks, a mathematician at Drexel University, Philadelphia, used computer algorithms to generate the mirror’s bizarre surface, which curves and bends in different directions. The curves direct rays from an object across the mirror’s face before sending them back to the viewer, flipping the conventional mirror image. As well as neat tricks like this, Hicks’ models make it possible to design mirrors that provide wide angled-views or eliminate distortion. (Image: Andrew Hicks) (via Gallery – The next generation of mirrors – Image 1 – New Scientist)

This mirror does not produce a “mirror” image, making it possible to read reflected text normally. Hicks, a mathematician at Drexel University, Philadelphia, used computer algorithms to generate the mirror’s bizarre surface, which curves and bends in different directions. The curves direct rays from an object across the mirror’s face before sending them back to the viewer, flipping the conventional mirror image. As well as neat tricks like this, Hicks’ models make it possible to design mirrors that provide wide angled-views or eliminate distortion. (Image: Andrew Hicks) (via Gallery – The next generation of mirrors – Image 1 – New Scientist)

Depiction: “Your data immediately becomes interactive”

Depiction

“Your data immediately becomes interactive, influencing the behavior of other elements.

“Add, edit, or even create new elements. Make rules to govern the interactions between elements in your Depiction.”

Depiction

“Your data immediately becomes interactive, influencing the behavior of other elements.

“Add, edit, or even create new elements. Make rules to govern the interactions between elements in your Depiction.”

The Army’s soldier suit of the future

“The Army’s soldier suit of the future, once left for dead, appears to be crawling back to life.

“After 15 years and a half-billion dollars in development, the Army officially cancelled the Land Warrior program, and its collection of electronic maps, GPS beacons, digital radios, and next-gen rifle scopes for infantrymen. All kinds of configurations of the wearable electronics were tried. But the gear always wound up being too bulky to justify the seemingly-modest help it provided frontline soldiers, the Army decided.

“And then, something rather odd and unexpected happened. The 4/9 — known since the early 1900’s as the “Manchus,” for their fighting in China — stripped Land Warrior down, made the gear more functional, and discovered the equipment could actually be pretty useful in combat.

“By consolidating parts, a 16-pound ensemble was whittled down to a little more than 10. A the digital gun scope was abandoned — too cumbersome and too slow for urban fights. And not every soldier in the 4/9 was ordered to lug around Land Warrior. Only team leaders and above were equipped.”

“The Army’s soldier suit of the future, once left for dead, appears to be crawling back to life.

“After 15 years and a half-billion dollars in development, the Army officially cancelled the Land Warrior program, and its collection of electronic maps, GPS beacons, digital radios, and next-gen rifle scopes for infantrymen. All kinds of configurations of the wearable electronics were tried. But the gear always wound up being too bulky to justify the seemingly-modest help it provided frontline soldiers, the Army decided.

“And then, something rather odd and unexpected happened. The 4/9 — known since the early 1900’s as the “Manchus,” for their fighting in China — stripped Land Warrior down, made the gear more functional, and discovered the equipment could actually be pretty useful in combat.

“By consolidating parts, a 16-pound ensemble was whittled down to a little more than 10. A the digital gun scope was abandoned — too cumbersome and too slow for urban fights. And not every soldier in the 4/9 was ordered to lug around Land Warrior. Only team leaders and above were equipped.”

Darpa says a soldier’s brain can be monitored in real time

Darpa says a soldier’s brain can be monitored in real time, with an EEG picking up “neural signatures” that indicate target detection. Pentagon to Merge Next-Gen Binoculars With Soldiers’ Brains

Darpa says a soldier’s brain can be monitored in real time, with an EEG picking up “neural signatures” that indicate target detection. Pentagon to Merge Next-Gen Binoculars With Soldiers’ Brains