A Modest Gold Farming Proposal

We spend so much damn time playing video games… much of which (for RTS games) is spent solving basic optimization problems (see Starcraft tutorial below). Could this apparent need for problems to solve be fulfilled by some information problem we already have?

Let’s say, for example, that we created a game set in a post-apocalyptic future — in which, perhaps, we’ve destroyed the environment by poorly managing our resources — and instead of killing ogres and gnomes, players can earn gold by sorting trash. Let’s say certain fictional companies pay for glass, others for aluminum, and so on. Could we plug this system into an actual factory for sorting waste streams?

But let’s not put the Chinese gold farmers out of a job; perhaps they can get paid to be NPCs, and can be compensated for creating compelling stories and experiences. I’m going to assume for a moment that gold farmers would enjoy being virtual storytellers to being virtual mercenaries.

We spend so much damn time playing video games… much of which (for RTS games) is spent solving basic optimization problems (see Starcraft tutorial below). Could this apparent need for problems to solve be fulfilled by some information problem we already have?

Let’s say, for example, that we created a game set in a post-apocalyptic future — in which, perhaps, we’ve destroyed the environment by poorly managing our resources — and instead of killing ogres and gnomes, players can earn gold by sorting trash. Let’s say certain fictional companies pay for glass, others for aluminum, and so on. Could we plug this system into an actual factory for sorting waste streams?

But let’s not put the Chinese gold farmers out of a job; perhaps they can get paid to be NPCs, and can be compensated for creating compelling stories and experiences. I’m going to assume for a moment that gold farmers would enjoy being virtual storytellers to being virtual mercenaries.

gumstix.com – way small computing Processor: Marvell® PXA270…

gumstix.com – way small computing

Processor: Marvell® PXA270 with XScale™

Speed: 400MHz

Memory: 64MB RAM / 16MB Flash

Features:
Bluetooth communications ( includes u.fl antenna @ 2.4 GHz ),
USB host signals,
CCD camera signals

Connections:
60-pin Hirose I/O connector,
120-pin MOLEX connector,
24-pin flex ribbon

Size: 80mm x 20mm

gumstix.com – way small computing

Processor: Marvell® PXA270 with XScale™

Speed: 400MHz

Memory: 64MB RAM / 16MB Flash

Features:
Bluetooth communications ( includes u.fl antenna @ 2.4 GHz ),
USB host signals,
CCD camera signals

Connections:
60-pin Hirose I/O connector,
120-pin MOLEX connector,
24-pin flex ribbon

Size: 80mm x 20mm

( @_@ ) (via mr_cactus) I find myself fascniated with the idea…

( @_@ ) (via mr_cactus)

I find myself fascniated with the idea of lots of tiny planets to explore. I thought I’d invented the idea myself (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry excepted), but learned to my bitter disappointment that Super Mario Galaxy does exactly that.

( @_@ ) (via mr_cactus)

I find myself fascniated with the idea of lots of tiny planets to explore. I thought I’d invented the idea myself (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry excepted), but learned to my bitter disappointment that Super Mario Galaxy does exactly that.

Colors I’ve used

Idea for a Kogbox snippet: “Colors I’ve Used” – a timeline of colors used in design work. You could extend it to fonts too. Basically input all the URLs of work you’ve done, upload all the images, and it extracts major colors. You can assign them dates. 

 Then do color analytics… how have your color choices changed over time? Spectral graphs… by RGB, saturation, color spread (what diversity of colors you’ve used), percent change based on hexidecimal values… 

Idea for a Kogbox snippet: “Colors I’ve Used” – a timeline of colors used in design work. You could extend it to fonts too. Basically input all the URLs of work you’ve done, upload all the images, and it extracts major colors. You can assign them dates. 

 Then do color analytics… how have your color choices changed over time? Spectral graphs… by RGB, saturation, color spread (what diversity of colors you’ve used), percent change based on hexidecimal values…