“[Wired.com]: You take up gardening, we get Pikmin. You get a bathroom scale, we get Wii Fit. I feel…”

[Wired.com]: You take up gardening, we get Pikmin. You get a bathroom scale, we get Wii Fit. I feel like it would be a disservice to our readers if I didn’t ask: What are your hobbies right now?

[Shigeru Miyamoto]: I knew someone was going to ask me that question. (Nintendo President Satoru) Iwata has told me absolutely not to tell anyone. Of course, I did go jogging in Central Park this morning.

[Wired.com]: All right, there’s our clue.

[Shigeru Miyamoto]: Yesterday I ate a hamburger.

Q&A: Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto Talks Wii Fit | Game | Life from Wired.com

[Wired.com]: You take up gardening, we get Pikmin. You get a bathroom scale, we get Wii Fit. I feel like it would be a disservice to our readers if I didn’t ask: What are your hobbies right now?

[Shigeru Miyamoto]: I knew someone was going to ask me that question. (Nintendo President Satoru) Iwata has told me absolutely not to tell anyone. Of course, I did go jogging in Central Park this morning.

[Wired.com]: All right, there’s our clue.

[Shigeru Miyamoto]: Yesterday I ate a hamburger.

Q&A: Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto Talks Wii Fit | Game | Life from Wired.com

“Now, giving people access to the underlying algorithms, again, it’s not as simple as you might…”

“Now, giving people access to the underlying algorithms, again, it’s not as simple as you might think, in that we’re dealing with these generative systems, and that we spent a lot of time discovering these rules that gave us reasonable-looking traffic or crime or whatever. So, it would more be the process of giving them access to the underlying generative structures, and letting them discover other rules. So that’s something that would be a very different thing than a game.”

Wil Wright, on being asked whether he’d considered letting players adjust the rulesets of SimCity,

“Now, giving people access to the underlying algorithms, again, it’s not as simple as you might think, in that we’re dealing with these generative systems, and that we spent a lot of time discovering these rules that gave us reasonable-looking traffic or crime or whatever. So, it would more be the process of giving them access to the underlying generative structures, and letting them discover other rules. So that’s something that would be a very different thing than a game.”

Wil Wright, on being asked whether he’d considered letting players adjust the rulesets of SimCity, unterbahnPosted on Categories Blog

In the Metal Recycling Business, It’s Loud, Dirty and Suddenly Lucrative

The company also attracts smaller-scale customers, like Johnny Slavos, 23, whose ponytail dripped with sweat the other day as he unloaded a 100-pound Cadillac engine that he said he had picked up at a junkyard. He would not say anything more about where he collects scrap metal. “I can’t tell you my secrets,” he said, explaining that he worried that others might elbow in on his turf. “It’s like the old gold rush.”

Nobody at the yard knows what happens to any of the scrap metal after it leaves the site. “Metal has no memory,” Mr. Monteleone said, looking down at the pen in his hand. “It could be made into this pen tip.”

The New York Times – June 27, 2008

The company also attracts smaller-scale customers, like Johnny Slavos, 23, whose ponytail dripped with sweat the other day as he unloaded a 100-pound Cadillac engine that he said he had picked up at a junkyard. He would not say anything more about where he collects scrap metal. “I can’t tell you my secrets,” he said, explaining that he worried that others might elbow in on his turf. “It’s like the old gold rush.”

Nobody at the yard knows what happens to any of the scrap metal after it leaves the site. “Metal has no memory,” Mr. Monteleone said, looking down at the pen in his hand. “It could be made into this pen tip.”

The New York Times – June 27, 2008

Chunking is not a city in China

**On the automatic generation of case libraries by chunking chess games **

Stephen Flinter1 and Mark T. Keane1

(1) Trinity College, Dublin

Abstract

As a research topic computer game playing has contributed problems to AI that manifest exponential growth in the problem space. For the most part, in games such as chess and checkers these problems have been surmounted with enormous computing power on brute-force search methods using massive databases. It remains to be seen whether such techniques will extend to other games such as go and shogi. One suggestion is that these games and even chess might benefit from a knowledge-based treatment but such approaches have met with limited success. The problem, as ever from such approaches, is the characterisation of the knowledge to be used by the system. This paper deals with the Tal system, which employs case-based reasoning techniques for chess playing. In the paper, rather than focus on playing, we concentrate on the automatic generation of suitable case knowledge using a chunking technique on a corpus of grandmaster games.

**On the automatic generation of case libraries by chunking chess games **

Stephen Flinter1 and Mark T. Keane1

(1) Trinity College, Dublin

Abstract

As a research topic computer game playing has contributed problems to AI that manifest exponential growth in the problem space. For the most part, in games such as chess and checkers these problems have been surmounted with enormous computing power on brute-force search methods using massive databases. It remains to be seen whether such techniques will extend to other games such as go and shogi. One suggestion is that these games and even chess might benefit from a knowledge-based treatment but such approaches have met with limited success. The problem, as ever from such approaches, is the characterisation of the knowledge to be used by the system. This paper deals with the Tal system, which employs case-based reasoning techniques for chess playing. In the paper, rather than focus on playing, we concentrate on the automatic generation of suitable case knowledge using a chunking technique on a corpus of grandmaster games.