In 1934, Otlet sketched out plans for a global network of…

In 1934, Otlet sketched out plans for a global network of computers (or “electric telescopes,” as he called them) that would allow people to search and browse through millions of interlinked documents, images, audio and video files. He described how people would use the devices to send messages to one another, share files and even congregate in online social networks. He called the whole thing a “réseau,” which might be translated as “network” — or arguably, “web.” (via The Mundaneum Museum Honors the First Concept of the World Wide Web – NYTimes.com)

In 1934, Otlet sketched out plans for a global network of computers (or “electric telescopes,” as he called them) that would allow people to search and browse through millions of interlinked documents, images, audio and video files. He described how people would use the devices to send messages to one another, share files and even congregate in online social networks. He called the whole thing a “réseau,” which might be translated as “network” — or arguably, “web.” (via The Mundaneum Museum Honors the First Concept of the World Wide Web – NYTimes.com)

“[Wired.com]: You take up gardening, we get Pikmin. You get a bathroom scale, we get Wii Fit. I feel…”

[Wired.com]: You take up gardening, we get Pikmin. You get a bathroom scale, we get Wii Fit. I feel like it would be a disservice to our readers if I didn’t ask: What are your hobbies right now?

[Shigeru Miyamoto]: I knew someone was going to ask me that question. (Nintendo President Satoru) Iwata has told me absolutely not to tell anyone. Of course, I did go jogging in Central Park this morning.

[Wired.com]: All right, there’s our clue.

[Shigeru Miyamoto]: Yesterday I ate a hamburger.

Q&A: Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto Talks Wii Fit | Game | Life from Wired.com

[Wired.com]: You take up gardening, we get Pikmin. You get a bathroom scale, we get Wii Fit. I feel like it would be a disservice to our readers if I didn’t ask: What are your hobbies right now?

[Shigeru Miyamoto]: I knew someone was going to ask me that question. (Nintendo President Satoru) Iwata has told me absolutely not to tell anyone. Of course, I did go jogging in Central Park this morning.

[Wired.com]: All right, there’s our clue.

[Shigeru Miyamoto]: Yesterday I ate a hamburger.

Q&A: Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto Talks Wii Fit | Game | Life from Wired.com

“Now, giving people access to the underlying algorithms, again, it’s not as simple as you might…”

“Now, giving people access to the underlying algorithms, again, it’s not as simple as you might think, in that we’re dealing with these generative systems, and that we spent a lot of time discovering these rules that gave us reasonable-looking traffic or crime or whatever. So, it would more be the process of giving them access to the underlying generative structures, and letting them discover other rules. So that’s something that would be a very different thing than a game.”

Wil Wright, on being asked whether he’d considered letting players adjust the rulesets of SimCity,

“Now, giving people access to the underlying algorithms, again, it’s not as simple as you might think, in that we’re dealing with these generative systems, and that we spent a lot of time discovering these rules that gave us reasonable-looking traffic or crime or whatever. So, it would more be the process of giving them access to the underlying generative structures, and letting them discover other rules. So that’s something that would be a very different thing than a game.”

Wil Wright, on being asked whether he’d considered letting players adjust the rulesets of SimCity, unterbahnPosted on Categories Blog